Muscular Fireworm Fossil Fittingly Named After Henry Rollins

Henry Rollins has accomplished a lot in his career, releasing legendary albums with seminal hardcore punk outfit Black Flag, pursuing the art form of spoken word, penning several books, starring in movies and he now has joined the ranks of musicians who have had fossils named after them!
That’s right, Henry Rollins’ name will now echo in the pantheon of zoology, with his name appearing in the binomial nomenclature of a newly discovered breed of fireworms. The worm has been dubbed Rollinschaeta myoplena and is a marine relative of earthworms and leeches.
Bristol PhD student Luke Parry commented on the discovery to phys.org, stating, “Fossil muscle tissue is rare and usually not described in any detail by paleontologists, but our discovery highlights that soft tissues preserved in fossils can offer details approaching what we can observe in living organisms. When choosing a name for our muscly beast, we decided to honor Henry Rollins, the legendary, muscular frontman of LA punk band Black Flag.”
Expanding on this was the co-author of the study at Bristol’s School of Earth Sciences, Dr. Jakob Vinther, who remarked, “While carrying out the research, we informally referred to the creature as ‘the muscle worm’ due to its preservation in almost pure muscle. Part of the reason why it’s preserved so well by muscle is that it was, in real life, a very buff little worm.” Explaining how the worm developed such an impressive muscular build, he continued, “Fireworms are active during the daytime on coral reefs and other environments with strong currents which makes them much more muscular compared to most other bristle worms.”
Other metal and punk musicians have had fossils named after them, including Sex Pistols‘ Sid Vicious, King Diamond, Lemmy Kilmister of Motorhead and Bad Religion‘s Greg Graffin.
Rollinschaeta Myoplena

  

Brotherhood Of Sleep – Dark as Light (LP) review 

As a way to broaden the metal scene in Greece,

The Athenian trio Brotherhood of Sleep released their second LP after their self titled one 2009 album in 2011 entitled Dark as Light. The album includes four rift- heavy, head-banging, rock out with your socks out songs which are completely instrumental pieces. Each of the four pieces, “Afterlife Unearthed”, “Naze”, “Aranian Gates” and “Dark as Light” although different seem to form an angsty narrative that sinks its teeth into the listener as Dark as light progresses.As the title in insinuates, the ambiance of the music seems to contrast mixing light and mellow elements together with dark and heavy elements fastened with the ohm-like spiritual sounds that reverberates throughout the entire album. This is especially evident in the track “Naze”, which is the longest track on the album at fourteen minutes and eleven seconds long.

As the Grecian scene grew more recognised one could have only hoped that Brotherhood of Sleep could have lead them to international recognition of underground music. However since their untimely split in 2013 this may no longer be the case.
By Zahra

Deftones Singer Chino Moreno Confesses to Being a Justin Bieber FanRead More: Deftones’ Chino Moreno Confesses to Being Justin Bieber Fan

Can you Belieb it!?
Chino Moreno has shocked Deftones fans around the world, admitting he’s a ‘Belieber’ and confessing to having the polarizing pop artist Justin Bieber on his iPod. While some might consider this heresy in the rock and metal world, the singer explained himself and refused to back down!
When speaking with Kerrang! magazine, the dynamic frontman was asked what song people would not expect to find on his iPod and the answer he gave was certainly unexpected. He responded with “What Do You Mean?” which is the latest from the young pop sensation. Defending himself, Moreno stated, “I actually downloaded this song just yesterday. I had to; it’s completely unavoidable! It comes on in the car every time I get in it. And you know what? I like it! I really do! I don’t know how surprised people will be about that. I think people who know me know that I listen to a lot of corny s–t! I’ve got no problem with it, so I’ll just keep on enjoying this one.”
Everyone has their guilty pleasures and considering Moreno’s résumé, he has earned a pass on this one. Earlier this year, Bieber was spotted wearing an Iron Maiden shirt and he was even recorded goofing around, mouthing guitar lines from Metallica‘s “Fade to Black” in 2013.
Moreno isn’t the first heavy metal figure to gush about his adoration for some pop music. Rob Halford of Judas Priest not only likes Lady Gaga, but has collaborating with the singer on his bucket list.

Deathcrusher Tour review 

Vicar Street, Dublin

Oct 26th 2015

 

Dublin has waited 18 years for a Carcass gig and in the space of 13 months they roll into town twice, this time with a host of Metal legends as part of the Deathcrusher Tour. Since it was announced back in June it was touted as the biggest extreme metal event to ever visit Dublin but, for me it was a question of who was going to come out on top.
The night’s mayhem began with New Yorkers “Herod”and although they had just a 20 minute set and a still half empty venue to play for they gave it their all and had the crowd, when they eventually dragged themselves from the bars and the merchandise stall, in good spirits for when Voivod hit the stage.
Voivod, who last appeared in Dublin in 2012, were a better known entity, and as the venue had filled up, appeared with a cameraman and lifelong Voivod fan Eric Campbell who was doing a video tour diary. 
The Canadian outfit blasted through Psychic Vacuum from their earlier career and thundered on towards The Unknown Knows and Voivod. Like Herod before them, time was not on their side but it was plain to see both band and crowd enjoyed it.

It was now time for the English to show what they can do and Napalm Death did not disappoint. 
No matter what other shit is going on, the English metal bands will always rule in Dublin, they can communicate with the crowd like life-long drinking buddies, as we say here, “havin’ the craic”. Vocalist Barney Greenway tearing around the stage like he was been attacked by a swarmwasps takes us through old favourites like Scum, Suffer the Children to material from their latest album (Apex Predator) Smash a Single Digit and Metaphorically Screw You. They finished up what was an energy charged set with their cover of the Dead Kennedys Nazi Punks Fuck Off. By this stage the crowd looked exhausted and there were still two bands to go.
Obituary was always going to have it tough, sandwiched between two of England’s “Gods of Grind”, they needed to show what they were made of. Unfortunately it was a bit of a letdown as it appeared John Tardy and Co wasmore interested in waving their perfectly groomed hair around like they were auditioning for a shampoo commercial. Don’t get me wrong, they did rip it up with “Centuries of Lies” and “Slowly we Rot” but it was all too tame for what I hoped for and they stuck rigidly to set times.
The same can’t be said for Carcass, time slots weren’tgoing to dictate their show. Carcass came out on stage and tore through “Unfit for Human Consumption and Buried Dreams”. Like Napalm Death earlier in the night there was an element of good old fashioned banter. Vocalist Jeff Walker insisting that because of some Irish blood he was going to get to the comedy section a bit later in the set. No stand-up act came but what did happen was a show that ripped every ounce of energy from the crowd, bodies went tumbling over the barrier at the front of the stage onto a busy few security guards as Incarnated Solvent Abuse and Cadaver Pouch Conveyor System was delivered with such intensity you could feel your bones vibrate. By the time Exhume to Consume and Reek of Putrefaction came round the crowd were totally fucked but they kept going, finding that extra bit of energy you can only summon at a Death Metal gig. 
Yeah, Carcass played over-time and yeah we missed our buses home but it was worth every ear-splitting second. The question before, who came out on top? Well the answer is obvious; the night belonged to Carcass and Napalm Death.    
Review by Andrew Cooke